Yachting News 23rd January 2012

Jan 24, 2012 No Comments by

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Riptides can carry hapless swimmers out into the ocean very quickly – by the time a lifeguard is able swim out to rescue them, it may be too late. Using a Jet Ski to reach struggling swimmers is one option, although such watercraft can be expensive, problematic to store on-site, and difficult to launch for one person. Now, seaside municipalities can get something cheaper and easier for reaching those swimmers-in-distress: an electric remote-control motorized rescue buoy called EMILY.

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January Newsletter here

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Greetings yachties,

In this issue:

America’s Cup – latest news here,

Naked Baby,

Volvo Ocean Race – where are they now?

Terry Hutchinson at the Dusseldorf Boat Show,

Sanya’s northerly move on leg 2,

Bay Week,

Enjoy

Introducing a new link on yachtyakka – a new online store – where you can buy online all you need to go sailing – check it out.

Naked baby – more here

website here

Tackling the tunnel

Groupama in the Volvo Ocean Race
With less than a day to go till the Straits of Malacca, the fleet had to deal with a major wind shift last night, which has reshuffled the cards a little. The monsoon and its cloud masses cannot always be forecast and Groupama 4 handled the resulting double change of tack pretty well…

“The weather conditions aren’t all that steady, aside from the fact that we’ve been sailing into a headwind since setting out from the Maldives… It’s a very fluky breeze: during the light airs of the first section, we had to keep an eye out for wind shifts and now that there’s a steadier, albeit moderate air flow, there are some sizeable rotations. You have to remain on the look-out. Today for instance, an error in the choice of tack costs more dearly than poor trimming! Just before daybreak, there was a 40° wind shift, despite there being no sign of it on the grib files: we thought it would only last a couple of hours but ultimately we sailed due North for around a hundred miles… Before tacking, you have to reckon on ten to fifteen minutes, which is the time it takes to restack all the gear down below and the sails on deck,” indicated Franck Cammas at the noon radio link-up this Thursday.

Fanning out in the tunnel

Indeed there was nothing to suggest there would be this substantial wind shift, which led to a ballet of tack changes for the whole fleet. The runaway winner of this intricate `pas de deux’ is Camper, which delayed launching into the merry dance until as late as possible, to end up to windward of the fleet whilst the breeze continued to veer (towards the ENE). She was the first to switch back onto an easterly heading, when the air flow returned to its usual orientation in the North-East. As such the New Zealanders have ended up the furthest to the South of the top four boats, whilst the Spanish are continuing to put all their chips on their northerly option as they approach the Straits of Malacca…

“Puma was the first to exploit this rotation as she was the furthest South, but she repositioned herself to pull level with us and Camper, then we decided that we too wanted to make the most of this shift and everyone followed suit. I think we tacked at the right time and even this afternoon (local time), we managed to get under way before the Americans, which has enabled us to snatch a few miles from Puma… She is about five miles to windward and Camper is a dozen miles to leeward of us. It’s always good to have a crew like Ken Read’s within sight, as it’s an excellent reference and you don’t fall asleep on deck! As regards performance, we’re pretty happy with our lot because we’ve been able to close on Camper, which is very quick in the light airs. I feel that we’ve made progress over these past four days of racing and we’re managing to hang onto them now.”

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For the first time race fans will be able to closely follow the fleet for the entire length of the Malacca Strait section via our Live Tracker here on volvooceanrace.com.

The Live function will be available when the boats enter the strait at around 1200 UTC tomorrow and fans can access it by opening the tracker as normal and pressing the red ‘Live’ button.

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latest news here

Camper with Emirates Team New Zealand

‎”We can see all of our rivals still including Telefonica, who we can see has had some gear damage, straight away you can see the importance of keeping the boat and the team in one piece in this leg.” Chris Nicholson

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Sea monster in charge in Year of the Dragon

Today may be the start of China’s Year of the Water Dragon but it is PUMA’s ‘sea monster’ Mar Mostro that is dominating in the Volvo Ocean Race having stretched their Leg 3 lead in the Indian Ocean drag-race overnight.

The six teams averaged speeds in excess of 10 knots overnight and extended the north-south divide, with more than 10 nautical miles now separating Team Telefónica to weather of the fleet and Team Sanya in the south.

It was the comeback crew on board Mike Sanderson’s Sanya who notched up the greatest 24-hour distance on the race to their homeport of Sanya, with their run of 254 nm helping them boost from last place to fifth.

But it was PUMA, situated in the middle of the fleet, who made the all the gains overnight, stretching a slim lead of just 0.1 nm over CAMPER at 1900 UTC on Sunday night, to a more respectable 1.85 nm by 0700 UTC on Monday.

Attacks on the US team were coming thick and fast overnight, with CAMPER constantly trying to advance on their port side, and the French team Groupama pushing on starboard.

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23 January 2012
Cayard’s Update

Artemis Racing is preparing its two AC45s for an upcoming training session in Valencia.  In November, we bought a second AC45 in order to create a competitive environment in-house. The two AC45s will enable us to train in the same manner as Oracle Racing currently trains, and as will Emirates Team New Zealand (ETNZ) and Luna Rossa later this month.  We will have our complete sailing team and coaching staff on site by the end of January.  The America’s Cup World Series resumes in April in Italy.

At the same time, our first AC72 is well underway in Sweden, the culmination of many months of research by Juan K and his talented team.

Over the holidays, there was a lot of activity with the Jury. Most importantly, the Jury ruled on the collaboration agreement between ETNZ and Luna Rossa. The ruling, which was in response to questions raised by Oracle Racing, maintains some significant limits on the Kiwi agreement.

Terry Hutchinson and some of the Artemis Racing crew have just returned from Key West Race Week.  They were racing with Doug DeVos on his TP52 Quantum Racing and won the their Class.  I am sure it was fun for the boys to get out on a track that they know so well and mix it up with the great fleet down there.

2012 will be a defining year for the AC teams. Most of the important activities of the campaigns will take place this year. The first AC72s will launch on July 1st and each team has a limit of 30 days to spend training. It will be interesting to see the different strategies on how to use the 30 days.

Paul

Terry Hutchinson enjoying the Q&A at the Dusseldorf Boat Show today

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The story about our northerly move on leg 2

I wasn’t going to spend many thoughts on “what could have been” if we had not broken that rigging part on Leg 2 – rather try to make it happen on another leg later in the race. But then the other day a mate sent me links to a couple of quite shallow and factually incorrect articles citing our decision to head north towards the low pressure system off Madagascar as to the reason why the rigging piece broke. So I thought it was only right to tell the full story and get the facts right.

During the 08-09 race when I sailed onboard “Ericsson 3”, we sailed for more than 10 days in conditions similar to those we sailed in the night before the D2 broke – fast reaching with the wind angle just aft of beam. And quite a few days in what I would call “much worse” conditions, conditions you would avoid if you could.

The high boat speeds and the apparent wind angle makes it uncomfortable to be on deck in conditions like we encountered on Leg 2, particularly at night when you can’t see the waves that are trying to smack you. But these conditions aren’t normally what break the boat, as you are sailing with small sails, boat not very loaded up and generally taking the waves at a good angle without much slamming or nose-diving that loads the boat up.

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