Yachting News 20th December 2011

Dec 19, 2011 No Comments by

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seasafe

Greetings yachties,

In this issue:

ISAF – OSR 2012/2013 (Off Shore Racing Rules) update,

Ker 40,

Volvo Ocean Race – Merry Christmas,

Christchurch – 4 more quakes,

Jules Verne Trophy – approaching/passing Cape Horn,

Speed Dream,

Outrageous Fortune to Hobart,

World On Water – episode 52,

Team Sanya, suffered damage rigging,

Volvo Ocean Race – where are they now,

Volvo Ocean Race – quotes from the boats here,

SITUATIONS VACANT – AUCKLAND STOPOVER ‘A’ TEAM VOLUNTEERS,

Global Ocean Race,

Enjoy

Introducing a new link on yachtyakka – a new online store – where you can buy online all you need to go sailing – check it out.

ISAF OFFSHORE SPECIAL REGULATIONS

3.03 Hull Construction Standards (Scantlings)

3.03.1 a) A yacht of less than 24m in hull length (measured in
accordance with ISO 8666) with the earliest of Age or Series Date on or after 1 January 2010 shall have:
• been designed, built and maintained in accordance with the requirements of ISO 12215
Category A *
• on board a certificate of building plan review from a notified body recognized by ISAF.
• on board a declaration signed and dated by the builder to confirm the yacht is built in accordance with the plans reviewed by the Notified Body.
b) A yacht of 24m in hull length and over (measured in accordance with ISO 8666) with the earliest of Age or Series Date on or after 1 January 2010 shall have:
• been designed, built and maintained in accordance with the requirements of a Classification Society recognized by ISAF
• on board a certificate of building plan review from a Classification Society recognized by ISAF
• on board a declaration signed and dated by the builder to confirm the yacht is built in accordance with the plans reviewed by the Classification Society.

3.03.2 a) A yacht of of less than 24m in hull length (measured in accordance with ISO 8666), with the earliest of Age or Series Date on or after 1 January 2010, if subject to any significant repair or modification to the hull, deck, coachroof, keel or appendages on or after the 1 January 2010, shall have:

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TEAM SANYA PLAN OF ACTION UPDATE

watch livestream here

ISSUED ON BEHALF OF TEAM SANYA:

TEAM SANYA ISSUE AN UPDATE ON REPAIR PROCESS THEY ARE FOLLOWING TO GET BACK INTO THE RACE AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE

Team Sanya issued an update today on the process they are following to ensure they can get back into the 2011-12 Volvo Ocean Race as quickly as possible and ensure they are 100% race ready ahead of the race into their home port of Sanya at the end of Leg Three.

Yesterday in Fort Dauphin, Madagascar, the team took their mast out and started the process of repair. They are working closely with Future Fibres, the manufacturer of the rigging system, to agree on the optimal solution.  Frano Tregaskis, Rigger for Team Sanya is travelling today from Madagascar to Valencia in Spain with the spreaders and will remain in Valencia with Future Fibres whilst they preparation the new rigging system.

Towards the end of December, the new rigging system will be transported by air freight out to the race boat in Madagascar and the team will work on completing the process as some cooking/curing of the new rigging will need to take place on site. Once the rigging is in the place, the mast will be re-stepped and some ‘on-dock’ tuning will follow.

In order to ensure satisfaction by all parties on the repair and fitness for purpose of the new rigging system, a number of days of sea trials will take place in early January off the coast of Madagascar before everyone is fully confident of the repair process that has been taken place.

The team and boat will then move to the safe haven port to be there by mid January and will wait there until the rest of the fleet are transported from the first safe haven port after their re-start in Abu Dhabi to the second safe haven port as part of Leg Three.

Team Sanya is totally focused on taking the time to ensure the repair is 100% to their satisfaction and they can enter the second part of Leg Three with full confidence to enable them to demonstrate the team’s ability to deliver results as they approach their home port of Sanya.

Leslie Greenhalgh
Commercial & Marketing Director
TEAM SANYA

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“We have done seven Hobart’s on the old Farr 40 and we just can’t sail her any faster. At this stage we aren’t close to reaching the Ker 40′s maximum boat speed – so it has completely reversed the game.”

This extra speed means Psaltis and his crew now expect to be much closer to the TP52s in the Rolex Sydney-Hobart race – effectively sailing in their weather pattern.

“In the Farr 40, we would basically hope to hang onto our rivals upwind while we waited for the wind to swing around and really get us going. Now we can compete upwind as well.”

With the Ker 40′s spectacular upwind and offwind performance already demonstrated in Europe – beating bigger boats on the water and demolishing the entire class 40 fleet in the 2011 Rolex Fastnet race, despite starting an hour behind them – the boat is set to dominate the 40-45 foot inshore and offshore fleets internationally, with eleven boats have now been sold to owners in the USA, Japan, New Zealand, UK, Singapore, Australia and Hong Kong.

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Winchrite cordless winch handle instantly provides power control to all your yacht’s winches.

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The Boss is in town for the Hobart.

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Quake-weary Christchurch got an unwelcome pre-Christmas reminder of the horror of February when two large earthquakes hit the city.

Three unoccupied buildings have collapsed and there have been a dozens of minor injuries.

Four large quakes hit the city this afternoon, the largest measuring 5.8 and 6.0, while the lesser ones measured 5.3 and 5.0.

They were centred offshore, between 10km and 20km east of the city, at depths between 6km and 10km, according to GNS Science.

They were felt widely around the South Island but there was no threat of a tsunami.

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Loïck Peyron

It was 7:50:30am on 23rd December (Paris time), after 30 days 22 hours 18 minutes and 48 seconds at sea, when the Maxi Banque Populaire V crossed the southern tip of the Americas and with it the last of the three capes of the course of the Jules Verne Trophy: the famous Horn. By posting a time of 10 days 15 hours 7 minutes and 15 seconds on the Pacific, Loïck Peyron and his men leave to Bruno, the elder brother of the skipper, the absolute record for the distance. The close proximity of a return in the Atlantic and the prospect of accelerating prevail on any award for the fourteen sailors on board.

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Kiwis hoping for outrageously good fortune in this year’s Rolex Sydney Hobart

A bunch of sailors from West Auckland have arrived in Sydney for this year’s Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race aboard a boat named after a popular New Zealand TV show about a bunch of West Aucklanders.

Quintin Fowler’s Beneteau First 45, Outrageous Fortune, sailed in through Sydney Heads on Monday exactly a week after the only New Zealand entry in this year’s fleet of 93 cleared customs at Opua, north of Auckland, and set off across the Tasman.

While at sea, Fowler, a self-confessed “true blue westie” from Swanson celebrated his 51st birthday with the crew’s rousing rendition of ‘happy birthday’ and an afternoon happy hour.

During the delivery they also experienced 50 knot winds and a busted Windex that had Fowler climbing to the top of the mast mid-ocean.
Lining up for the Rolex Sydney Hobart has been a long held dream for the owner/skipper who, like many of his countrymen, has tried to crack into the circle of crew who make the lucky final draft for the southern hemisphere’s greatest annual ocean race.

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follow the race here

watch the race start live here

ROGUE CLOUDS TEST NAVIGATORS TO THE LIMIT

As well as battling with incessant heat and severe sleep deprivation, the crew of the five boats racing towards their secret destination, led by Leg 1 winner  Telefónica (Iker Martínez/ESP), are paying particular attention to the clouds.

Rogue clouds can be seen on radar and can signal lots of wind or, the real dread to sailors, no wind at all. It is a minefield for the crews as they pick their way carefully towards the more stable westerly breeze on the northern side of the Doldrums.

“A lucky cloud can definitely help, but get in the wrong spot and they can park you right up,” says Simon Fisher from Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, currently in fifth place, 120 nautical miles behind Telefónica, but making a comeback and averaging a fast 19 knots.

“Most ‘yachties’ would take wind over calms any day,” says Will Oxley, CAMPER’s navigator. The red boat is clinging on to second place despite losing 15 nm to Telefónica in the past three hours. “The calms are our enemy,” Oxley says.

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tracker link here

From the blogs around the yachts

Again it’s getting hotter and humid down below especially and a simple tasks like bailing a bucket of water, which there are many of, cooking a meal, or going to the toilet can leave you dripping with sweat.

Sleeping is becoming very uncomfortable, sleeping bags are not only not needed, but a major inconvenience to have anywhere near you.

You are constantly sticky and damp with sweat and you really know you haven’t had a shower for 11 days. And it’s smells like my feet and socks that you know you really need a shower as soon as possible.

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Not too much to report out here right now as we plough on northeast at about 18 knots. I have just got off the wheel and it is great fun on deck – 17 knots of trade wind, nice waves to catch, 29 degrees water temperature and clear skies. It is not such good fun down below.

The whole boat smells of wet dog inside. Our one can of air freshener is on its last legs

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With Azzam’s first equator crossing coming up shortly, there can only one reason for the harvesting of flying fish, the traditional sacrifices for King Neptune. Those of us who have not crossed the equator before will soon be initiated by King Neptune and his codfish and will surely meet these flying fish again. But until then, I’m still campaigning the animal rights of Flying Fish, and will do everything I can to save those little buggers and set them free again.

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But being here brings us back to a humble place, and it really sets in how fortunate and lucky we all are to have the resources that we do, to be able to do what we love day in and day out…

Lastly, for now, there is a slight dust over some of the crew after last night, One of us (not me) is going to be a father in 6 months time, and we are all very excited and elated for our mate. We wish him and his family all the best; this is both positive and great news for Team SANYA!

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Latest blog from Andres at this heartbreaking time for the guys:

Words can’t describe… I honestly don’t know where to begin; there is feeling of total disillusionment on board. Make no mistake; there isn’t a single person on the boat at the moment that is not feeling pretty low. The saying, “only worry about things that you can control,” comes to mind but those words are certainly not all that comforting at the moment. If you look around the yacht, there are many different expressions, but all in some way represent a sadness that is indescribable.

“Lowest of lows,” described Watch Captain Richard Mason as he prepared a jury rig for the D2, which sheered off at some time during the night. David Rolfe (Dingo) noticed it early this morning while preparing to do a sail change. “That’s experience!” described Mike Sanderson of Dingo’s awareness, “Had we tacked the rig would have certainly come down,” he finished.

Most of the lads wanted space to digest the situation and a few have found peace in their bunks and sleeping bags. Watch Captain, Cameron Dunn, who headed up the tidying up process, simply commented, “Its gutting… absolutely gutting…”

We are heading to the island of Madagascar, a set plan for what is to happen is not finalised as yet but our top ranked shore team is already working on a plan and we are 120% certain that we are in good hands…

That’s really all I have for you now… Everyone on board thanks you all for your continued support in our team, we wanted to desperately to give you something to be proud of and we promise to continue to give our best effort to do so in the future.

Thank you,

andrés

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Team Sanya suffer rigging damage, head to port for repair

Team Sanya suffered damage to part of their rigging early on Monday and are heading to a port in southern Madagascar in order to assess the damage and make a repair plan. No one has been injured and the crew are all safe.

Sanya noticed the damage to one of the stays on the mast during a sail change on Leg 2 from Cape Town to Abu Dhabi and contacted Race Management.

The boat is fully under control with the mast still upright and is still able to sail to shore.

Skipper and team CEO Mike Sanderson said he was “gutted”, with the incident occuring when the team was in the lead.

“We were just out of the major breeze and changing sails from the J4 to the fractional zero and were in wind speeds of around 12-14 knots when we noticed a vital piece of rigging loose from the mast (D2),” said Sanderson.

“We had had an awesome night’s racing and were totally hauling and making massive gains so we were very upbeat with our progress.

“The weather was turning for the better and so we were happy in our decisions and general progress. We had been due to tack an hour earlier in the darkness but had delayed that given the conditions and for sure if we had done that, the rig would have fallen over the side.

“As you can imagine we are totally gutted and can’t quite believe this has happened when everything was going so well.”

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Photo PAUL TODD/Volvo Ocean Race

follow the chatter on crew.org here

Record breaking speeds at 49 degrees South

On Cessna Citation, Colman and Goodchild judged the frontal system’s approach immaculately: “Sam and I decided to go for broke to consolidate our lead over the Fields,” reports Conrad Colman. “We ran deep through puffy 45+ knot squalls and positioned ourselves in the path of the beast,” he explains.  “It might not be evident that sustained 35 knots was an opportunity to attack, but we figured that if we could keep our foot on the loud pedal and stay ahead of the worst of it, then we could play the edge of the front and skim off as much wind as we wanted.”

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GOR leaders are beyond the ice limit and dropping south

Over the past week, the five, double-handed Class40s in the Global Ocean Race (GOR) have crossed the most remote area of the Indian Ocean with a cold front and a deep low pressure system battering the fleet. While the two lead boats, Cessna Citation and BSL, dropped to 48S after crossing the Celox Sailing Scoring Gate at Kerguelen Island, the majority of the fleet kept further north in Roaring Forties with Financial Crisis and Phesheya-Racing in fourth and fifth place losing miles as a cold front swept east, forcing the two Class40s to take avoiding action.

On Thursday, Cessna Citation and BSL reached the western end of the GOR’s Australian Ice Limit at 45S, increasing speeds dramatically while Campagne de France in third languished temporarily in unusually light winds, waiting for the low pressure system and strong breeze. When the low pressure arrived, winds of 52 knots lashed the fleet, building monstrous seas and forcing many of the teams to adopt survival mode.  After 19 days and over 4,000 miles of sailing in Leg 2 from Cape Town to Wellington, the GOR fleet is currently strung over 1,300 miles in the Indian Ocean’s high latitudes with the recent, very tough week adding 700 miles to the overall spread between the boats.

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From Ross Field on BSL

I came down below to get some much need rest. I took my boots off and got into my bunk with all my wet weather gear on.  I was deep asleep and got this scream from on deck.  I leaped out of bed, put my boots on – wrong feet in each – and came through the hatch like greased lightening and saw the wake out the back of the boat foaming and Campbell steering looking straight ahead with his eyes as big as saucers.  I could see it was windy and then read it was 48 knots, raining and hail – f*** was used a lot whilst we discussed how the f*** we were going to get out of this.

The boat was fully loaded, pushing in the water from being overload, spray everywhere and freezing cold.  The feeling of the boat is best described as like when you are cruising along in your car with cruise control on and you go into a corner and don’t turn the cruise control off – an airy feeling. I took over driving and man it was all on.  We decided that we would snuff the spinnaker.

My biggest fear is if you wait till the squall passes, the wind will increase to 50 knots +, you broach and tear the rig out of the boat.  The snuffing didn’t work and to cut a long story short, the spinnaker ended up flying horizontally……………….

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