Yachting News 16th November 2011

Nov 17, 2011 No Comments by

seasafe

Greetings yachties,

Seems to be video city at the mo with bucket loads from the Volvo and AC45. Better upgrade your data plan folks.

In this issue:

Laura Dekker,

RC44,

AC45 – San Digeo – live webcam here,

Volvo Ocean race updates – lots of them,

Enjoy

Introducing a new link on yachtyakka – a new online store – where you can buy online all you need to go sailing – check it out.

here is the link to the live racing in San Digeo

however, if you live in New Zealand, you get this…

found a link on the TVNZsite, the video quality is very poor, better than nothing.

and from the Americas Cup media people

Dear Steve,

thank you for your message.
Races in New Zealand are live streamed (and available on demand) on TVNZ website; on Monday, the final fleet race will also be broadcast on TV ONE.
I will ensure this is more clearly communicated through various channels.
Best regards,
Irene
Irene Corosu
Media Relations Coordinator

Fernando to Cape Town: the expert analysis

As the fleet come up against their next obstacle, the St Helena High, the Volvo Ocean Race’s chief meteorologist Gonzalo Infante takes a look at what lies in store.

Having made it over the Equator and into the Southern Hemisphere, in the second part of Leg 1 the fleet must use the southeast trade winds to their best advantage but also have to negotiate their way around the massive Saint Helena High Pressure system, which effectively blocks any direct route to Cape Town.

The St Helena High is a large scale system whose counterpart in the north Atlantic is the Azores High. When crossing an ocean either way between north and south you always have to deal with this sort of obstacle.

Much more solid than the Azores High, the St Helena High generally creates good wind corridors (pressure gradient areas) around its windless centre and often meaning high wind, fast sailing conditions for the Volvo Open 70s.

Potentially, this is one of the most likely sections of the race most for record breaking 24-hour runs from the boats. Figure 1, the line graph, shows monthly high pressure centre in relation to  latitude. In November the average position is at 29.5 degrees south – very close to the Cape Town latitude. The seasonal variation in high pressure latitude means that the closer we are to the Austral Summer, the more probable will be to have the high pressure system blocking the direct route to Cape Town.

more here

where are they now?

After 47 days sailing across the Indian Ocean Guppy and I are in Durban, South-Africa. On my last night at sea I met with intensifying ship traffic and came to feel the strong northern Agulhas Current with its higher and steeper waves coupled with a southerly wind blowing at 25 knots that fortunately slowly faded away. It was the middle of the night when I could hear for the first time an African radio broadcast station and also caught a glimpse of some small lights in the distance before we suddenly were swallowed by fog, a very thick fog. Then came the squalls, one after another carrying plenty of drizzle while my radar system kept reporting on the ships around me, ships that I couldn’t see at all. Ten nautical miles from Durban I couldn’t see anything… Five nautical miles and I still couldn’t see…Three nautical miles and… Yes, I can see it! I sighted softly…I was too sea weary to laugh or do a merry dance. Normally I would bounce of joy coming in harbor and this happiness would stay with me for a couple of days. Oh yes, sure I was happy, but I also had mixed feelings knowing that my peaceful time aboard Guppy and harmony with nature were soon to be disrupted. Slowly one after the other skyscrapers rose out of the mist as we approached the large industrial harbour. There was only one mile left to the breakwaters and I reported to the port authority by radio. I was told that there was a ship now comming out of port so I had to wait for this sea monster to pass me by as it went out. Then it was my turn and I made my way to the opposite end of the harbour where I finally entered the marina. A little later as I went to the port authority’s office I had to be extremely focused if I didn’t want to go walking right into the water as the dock and everything else around me on shore was moving! When I took my first steps on the jetty, my first reaction was to fly right back aboard Guppy to the safety of my natural environment.

more here

Energy Team on top as three different teams post wins at the America’s Cup World Series in San Diego

Consistency was the key for the French Energy Team who won the third of three races on Wednesday afternoon to top the table at the end of the seeding races for the San Diego Match Racing Championships at the America’s Cup World Series.

New skipper Yann Guichard posted three race finishes inside the top five to end the day one point clear of Emirates Team New Zealand. ORACLE Racing Spithill, plagued by penalties and starting trouble all day, recovered strongly in each race to hold on to third place.

Those top three teams on today’s ranking are seeded through directly to the Semi Finals of the Match Racing Championship. The remaining six teams will be paired up to race in Thursday’s qualifying matches, competing in a knockout format to earn the fourth and final Semi Final berth.

“It’s a perfect day for us,” said an elated Guichard after racing. “I’m really happy. The team has done a fantastic job. I’m getting more comfortable each day and I can really feel the boat well now. We had some good starts and were very fast today. The small teams like us are improving each day.”

Conditions couldn’t have been better for racing on Wednesday. The winds were in the 9-13 knot range with flat water in San Diego Bay, leading to boat speeds near 20 knots. The sun was out, and it was a warm November day, allowing the sea breeze to build early and stay in force throughout the afternoon.

After the fleet races, the teams brought the show to the crowds perched on Broadway Pier for the AC 500 Speed Trials, which took place just yards from the pier. Emirates Team New Zealand, in the very first run, posted what would stand up as the quickest time down the 500-meter runway.

more here

OPPORTUNITIES ON THE HORIZON AFTER LEADERS PASS HALFWAY MARK

The playing field could be about to open up as the first leg passes the halfway mark and the teams, led by PUMA Ocean Racing powered by BERG and tireless rivals Team Telefónica, take on the complex weather systems of the South Atlantic.

After a drag race to Fernando de Noronha that was only interrupted by a short spell in the Doldrums – and initiation ceremonies for sailors crossing the Equator for the first time — the crews must now face the St Helena High, a huge, continually morphing area of high pressure sitting between them and finish line in Cape Town.

With more than 3,200 nautical miles still to go in the 6,500nm first leg from Alicante, Volvo Ocean Race weather expert Gonzalo Infante said tactics during the next stage of the leg could be the deciding factor in the sprint to the finish.

“The latest forecasts show a big high pressure system blocking the way into Cape Town. The teams will have to navigate close to the centre of the St Helena High and this could provide opportunities for a reshuffle of the leaderboard.”

PUMA’s Mar Mostro, skippered by Ken Read, held the lead at 1300 UTC, 12 nautical miles ahead of Team Telefónica who have clung like a shadow to their rivals since the race start in Alicante, Spain, on November 5. The American team were first across the Equator and also led the fleet around Fernando de Noronha, the only turning mark in Leg 1.

PUMA navigator Tom Addis said their plan was to continue to dive south in search of winds that could catapult them towards the finish line.

“The general plan here is to go south round the St Helena High. It’s looking fairly conventional now, which is good. The worst fear in this part of the world is having to go upwind into Cape Town, but luckily it doesn’t look like that.”

more here

PUMA leads as fleet focuses on Fernando

Unlike previous Volvo Ocean Races, the rounding of the island of Fernando de Noronha this time does not score any race points. However, it is still a mark of the course and the order of rounding will be a significant psychological boost for the front runners, PUMA’s Mar Mostro with American Ken Read in charge, and his immediate and constant opponent, Telefónica skippered by Spanish superstar sailor, Iker Martínez.

Tonight at 1900, PUMA’s Mar Mostro continues her dominance of the fleet and is making steady progress at 13 knots towards the Brazilian archipelago 129 nautical miles (nm) ahead. Both PUMA’s Mar Mostro and Telefónica who is 14 nm behind the leader and has been shadowing Mar Mostro for most of this leg, will round under the cover of darkness.

Telefónica and CAMPER (Chris Nicholson/AUS) have made negligible losses tonight, but fourth-placed Groupama 4 (Franck Cammas/FRA) dropped nine miles on the leader over the course of the last three hours and has an average boat speed of 10.6 knots. She is now 359 nm behind PUMA and the three boats in front of her are able to sail at least a knot faster. It’s going to be a long night for the French team.

more here

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