Yachting News 15th August 2011

Aug 15, 2011 No Comments by

Decision to sink or tow yacht expected today

photos thanks to Carlo Borlenghi.

Rambler 100 capsizes – all Crew rescued

Statement by the Royal Ocean Racing Club, issued 2053 BST Monday, 15th August 2011

The yacht Rambler 100 has capsized between the Fastnet Rock and the Pantaenius Buoy. The Irish Coastguard services are coordinating the rescue. The Baltimore RNLI lifeboat is on the scene. Two Sikorsky helicopters have been scrambled and an Irish Naval vessel is en route to the scene of the accident

All 21 crew have been rescued.

A further statement will be released when more information becomes known.

Ian Loffhagen
Racing Manager

more here

more images here on regattanews.com

follow the chatter on Sailing Anarchy here

We just got word that the 100′ monohull Rambler has capzised off the Fastnet rock, all accounted and one woman airlifted to hospital. The boat is floating upside down, keel gone. Awaiting updates. Jump in the thread with info..

 

seasafe

Aakron Boats has the widest range of quality inflatable boats and RIB’s in New Zealand, all at the best possible prices. Buy direct and save.

more here

Greetings yachties,

Just got back from SSANZ race 2, more news a bit later.

In this issue:

Promise race report – SSANZ  race 2,

Airlie Beach latest news,

ETNZ – win the winner take all final event in Cascais,

Fastnet updates including Vanquish report,

Should you get an inflatable or hard dinghy?

DesTop News,

Scuttlebutt USA – latest issue here,

Asian Yachting News – latest issue here,

The Digest Oracle Racing – latest issue here,

Enjoy

 

Promise  Race Report

SSANZ60, 13 Aug 2011

Up at 6, light the fire, make coffee then down to boat via a supermarket for supplies.  Bacon, eggs bread rolls, ginger beer and ice.  All set.

Found the start in the mist.  Fog-horns from something big were a bit unnerving though!

Finally got away at the pin end at the gun, just to weather of Azure.  They tacked to clear their air, as did Max Headroom.  We went with them.  Had to bear away to get down around Motuihe Red buoy and were surprised to see the boats against the Rangi shore were just ahead (more tide?)  Saw birds working as we approached Waiheke, so threw out the bungee lure to see if we could pick up some dinner.  Could see the longhaul boats parked up off the end of Waiheke.  We bore away to sea but still found the hole.  A lotto ticket.  Fast Company and Cool Change were behind but to weather when we went into the hole, they stayed high and got through before us.  Once we got back into breeze we decided to make the most of the inside rotation and tack up the shore.  Could see the small boats getting swept back with the tide against Motutapu.  Poor buggers.  Tacking up the shore we never dreamed everyone would get lifted to Gannet and get around inside us!  Psychic must have got through at least 20 minutes ahead, they were well on their way to Tiri by the time we got around gannet with Azure and Max Headroom.  We gybed inside Azure before setting big kite.  So 9 or 10 kites in front as we settled down for ride to Tiri.  Passing the Noises, Steve says ‘got a fish’.  Choice! every time that rig gets wet it comes back with food.  New dilemma, no oil or butter, ahhh but there is home brew.  Beer battered fish without the batter, into the frying pan with a bit of beer and it was the tastiest kahawai I have ever eaten!  Boats ahead were getting more shy so we take the height when we can.  Spinnaker held all the way to Navy.  Dropped the kite as we rounded at dusk.  Still in touch with our 1020 friends.  Small gains on boats ahead, this maybe more optimism than actual gains, they were a long way ahead!

Darkness now, so lots of lights all around but no idea who was who.  On the wind home, which way?  Some stayed out and most went in to the shore.  We decide to split the difference and went most of the way in to avoid the tide, but stayed off the shore to stay in pressure.  Picked the layline right past the monster.  As we were looking for the finish Azure crossed just ahead of us and we crossed just ahead of Max.  Two or three more tacks and thats how we finished.  Our tacking with two was better than our Monday nights with 8!  Amazing how similarly these different designs sail (1020 & S34), in each others way at the start, and still together at the finish.  Back to Westhaven for bacon and eggs and a rum or two.

A great day out, superb sailing, delicious fresh fish for dinner accompanied by some fine Waiheke home brew.  We really do live in paradise…..

Thanks as always to the organisers.  Bring on the 100.

Brett

Promise

details call Graham 07 348 8829

Faced with another great weather forecast, 12-20 knots of breeze from the south east, Principal Race Officer Tony Denham chose to send the record race fleet to fight the tide in the Molle Channel to White Rock.

The Race Committee gunned the divisions away from 10.30am.

The Multihulls were sent on a 29 nautical mile course from Pioneer Bay, upwind to the Mandalay clearing buoy, down the Molle Channel where the tide flows can approach three knots, to the guano covered White Rock, then back inside West Molle Island (Daydream Island Resort), then across Pioneer Bay to Grimston Point and back to the finishing line.

The IRC Cruising, Super 30s, Performance Racing and Cruising Division 1, were set a similar course but round the Bluff mark rather than the Grimston Point mark, 24 nautical miles in all.

Cruising 2, Non-Spinnaker and Sports Boats classes faced a shorter 20 mile course, back from West Molle, around Pioneer Point and directly to the finish line.

The Multihull division was first away and started in six to eight knots of breeze. Just two tacks for the red trimaran TeamVodafoneSailing (Simon Hull) to the top mark, a polished performance indeed. Behind them on the port lay line followed Trilogy (Keith Glover) and Cynophobe (Dave Chittleborough), while e-Marine Bare Essentials (Tim Pepperell) crossed the line about three minutes late.

As the majority of the boats headed up the Molle Channel, TeamVodafoneSailing was heading back to Pioneer Rock in about 12-14 knots of breeze and she finished well ahead of the rest of her multihull rivals.

more here

YouTube Helps ACEA with America’s Cup TV Revolution

by America’s Cup Editor

The America’s Cup is yet to convince too many TV networks that their new sailing product is the way to go. TVNZ have signed up, captializing on the fact that Emirates Team NZ is a nation-based team with strong commercial credentials, but almost all the other teams (not counting the defender ORACLE Racing) are yet to build any real fan-base.

It will be a while before the America’s Cup Event Authority sees any commercial return on investment. With a 100-strong outside broadcast crew, three helicopter cameras, four cameras on water, and land-based cameras the Cup is investing (read – losing money on) in onboard cameras, designed to be as ergonomic and lightweight as possible to minimize their impact on the racing yachts and 14 onboard microphones will capture every sound.

Pushing the boundaries is one thing, but unless the Cup starts delivering audiences, the Networks aren’t going to want to give up expensive airtime to 12,000 or so Facebook fans of the cup.

Until the deals are done, fans of the America’s Cup, have to be content with the product being streamed by YouTube. The partnership between ACTV and YouTube is developing some new ways to watch – allowing fans to play producer and choose which cameras they want to watch and which commentary they want to listen to.

more here

Cayard comments on the ACWS – Cascais

15 August 2011

The first racing of the new America’s Cup is now in the record books.  In yesterday’s only and final race, there were three lead changes, the top boat speed was 24 knots, the course had 6 legs, and the race took 40 minutes and was within .5 miles of the shore.  Everything that had been promised was delivered.  Cascais delivered perfect conditions all week with wind between 8 and 18 knots.

For those who thought catamaran racing would be dull and boring, this past week has been a wake up call.  The final of the match racing yesterday between Emirates Team New Zealand and ORACLE Racing Spithill was classic match racing with the competitors even tacking on each other at upwind speeds of 15 knots.

Artemis Racing did well here this past week. On this final weekend, Skipper Terry Hutchinson and his crew finished third in the match racing and 2nd in the fleet race.  Emirates Team New Zealand was the top team with a win in yesterday’s fleet race and a second place in the match racing to ORACLE Racing’s Jimmy Spithill and his team.  While our performance here is a good start, our sights are set on winning in Plymouth in less than one month’s time.

Chris Drapper and his Team Korea had a great showing in the match racing defeating Russell Coutts in the ¼ finals.  Team China had moments of brilliance and the least prepared team, Green Comm improved dramatically as the week went on.  The international  of this fleet is very cool.

There is much to learn in racing these boats.  New strategies for starting, course management,  sail trim and boat handling.  These boats are extremely physical for the crew.  I was looking at the heart rate data of one of our crew for a race the other day and his average heart rate for the 25 minute race was 91% of his maximum.  His minimum heart rate was 82% and he hit 100% three times!  Athletics has finally hit sailing!

It was fantastic to see this new sailing “product” rolled out in such a convincing way. The live internet coverage of the racing was very well done with graphics that show the course boundaries like a basketball court.  Other graphics for the “zone” around the marks. The replays of critical moments along with commentary were cool.  Sure, all this can be improved still and will, but it is such a huge leap forward from past coverage of sailing.

All in all, it was very exciting to witness and to be part of.  Onward and upward.  I am heading to Sweden today for the RC44 racing in Marstrand this week.

For complete results and video please go to www.americascup.com

Paul

© ACEA (2011)/ Photo G. Martin-Raget

Emirates Team New Zealand claims the first AC World Series with a dramatic come-from-behind win in Cascais, Portugal.

 

Emirates Team New Zealand made an incredible recovery during the ‘winner takes all’ fleet race on Sunday to win the America’s Cup World Series Cascais, the first event of a new global series leading up to San Francisco in 2013.

With nine boats on the start line, the competition was close, and with a tricky, patchy race course area, there were passing lanes throughout the day. ORACLE Racing Spithill jumped out to a convincing lead early, but couldn’t protect it. On the second lap of the race course, Kiwi skipper Dean Barker found more wind on his side of the race course to make the pass.

“For us it was fantastic,” Barker said. “It was always going to be a very difficult race, as the breeze never really established. There were big ‘holes’ in the race course, so it was about being at the right place at the right time.”

Artemis Racing, too, was able to work its way up to a second place finish from being back in the pack early; the early leader, ORACLE Racing Spithill, was forced to settle for third.

more here

34th America’s Cup and YouTube Announce Groundbreaking Media Partnership

Focused on pushing the boundaries of fan interactivity, event organizers of the 34th America’s Cup and YouTube have announced a global partnership to elevate sports content consumption.

Combining the world-class content developed by the in-house America’s Cup Television (ACTV) and Technology teams with YouTube’s powerful media platform and livestreaming capabilities, the online partnership will deliver into people’s homes like never before. America’s Cup racing will now offer online viewers the choice of different video and audio streams – instead of one just view – thanks to the YouTube multi-screen experience.

“The new America’s Cup is all about transforming the way people see the sport of sailing and with YouTube, we can put the viewer in the driver’s seat of their experience, “ said Stan Honey, Director of Technology, America’s Cup Event Authority. “With YouTube’s reach across vast, multi-generational audiences, we’re hugely excited about the potential of this partnership to reach broader audiences than ever before.”

With the player, viewers can choose from live footage onboard with a team, a graphical overview or an eagle’s eye view as part of the daily livestreaming from race events. In addition, viewers can select different audio tracks, either expert sailing or standard sports commentary. This feature will be available on both the America’s Cup YouTube channel and the America’s Cup website, and will compliment the live and highlights coverage offered by traditional broadcasters.

more here

 

We just got word that the 100′ monohull Rambler has capzised off the Fastnet rock, all accounted and one woman airlifted to hospital. The boat is floating upside down, keel gone. Awaiting updates. Jump in the thread with info..

Rambler 100 capsizes – all Crew rescued

Statement by the Royal Ocean Racing Club, issued 2053 BST Monday, 15th August 2011

The yacht Rambler 100 has capsized between the Fastnet Rock and the Pantaenius Buoy. The Irish Coastguard services are coordinating the rescue. The Baltimore RNLI lifeboat is on the scene. Two Sikorsky helicopters have been scrambled and an Irish Naval vessel is en route to the scene of the accident

All 21 crew have been rescued.

A further statement will be released when more information becomes known.

Ian Loffhagen
Racing Manager

more here

photo thanks to Carlo Borlenghi.

Beatrice Witzgall Media Team Phaedo found them and rescued them

more images here

meanwhile back at the finish

Maxi Banque Populaire, the French 140 foot trimaran skippered by Loick Peyron, set a new outright multihull race record for the Rolex Fastnet Race when she reached Plymouth this evening at 19:48:46, for an elapsed time of 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (32 hrs, 48 mins), and an average speed around the course of 18.5 knots.

more here

more images from Sanya here

 

The record-sized Rolex Fastnet Race fleet set sail from Cowes in classic conditions – a beat westward up the Solent in a building west-southwesterly and sunshine, but with an ominous looking cloud line over the mainland.

In the end there were 314 starters, the largest fleet ever to start the Rolex Fastnet Race following the previous record of 303 in 1979.

The first start at 1100 BST saw the giant multihulls heading off. Fastest out of the blocks were Gitana 11 (FRA), the 23.5m trimaran skippered by Vendee Globe and Volvo Ocean Race skipper Sebastien Josse and Roland Jourdain’s MOD70 Veolia Environnement (FRA). With round the world yachtswoman Dee Caffari manning her aft grinders, Veolia’s sistership, Steve Ravussin’s Race For Water (SUI), was over the line early and had to restart.

Visible from most parts of the Solent with her 40 meter long hulls and 47 meter tall mast, the world’s fastest offshore boat, the Loïck Peyron-skippered Maxi Banque Populaire (FRA) trimaran, thundered across the line and had reached the Needles within an hour, sailing upwind at more than 20 knots. Five hours after starting, Banque Populaire was already approaching Start Point, close to 100 miles down the southwest coast from the start.

Next up were the IMOCA 60 monohulls, and by the Needles, Marc Guillemot — Yann Elies doublehander Safran (FRA), were leading the newer generation boats.

more here

more fastnet news here

follow the yellowbrick tracker here

Cowesonline link here

Chris Welch

Day 2 – 1:31 AM

As I have just come off watch for the first time in the race and look at my watch, half an hour has passed already. As everyone is guaranteed four hours of exciting on watch sailing, four hours of rest isn’t a given. After briefing my opposite watch-man Jesse Fielding on the conditions on deck, I scurried down below. Upon arriving I stuffed my face with a delicious freeze-dried meal. After that I began stripping off my foul weather gear and extra cold-weather thermals. This is a seemingly simple task except for trying to keep my stuff dry and in my cubbie. After all that is done it is finally time for bed. Thirty minutes now are gone, plus an additional fifteen to get ready again. This sailor’s “off” time is dwindling! Goodnight for now from Vanquish.

Chris

more here

Which is Best: Inflatable or Hard Dinghy?


If you’re cruising offshore, should you get an inflatable (RIB) or hard dinghy? As with all sailing gear, sailors have plenty of opinions on which is better. For example, while being profiled in “Interview with a Cruiser,” the cruisers aboard Reach claimed that they “personally would not want to be without a RIB with a [15hp] outboard large enough to plane with two people and a healthy amount of cargo.” I remember this statement because our dinghy has a 2 1/2hp engine and it works just fine – the engine is easy to move from the dinghy to our boat too.

With all these opinions floating around it’s hard to figure out what best fits your needs when it comes to dinghy selection, which is why this column in the Women and Cruising blog is helpful. The two authors compare the pros and cons of hard bottomed dinghies vs. RIBs and also point out that you should think about how you are going to use the dinghy before you buy. They also give their opinion on the big brands out there.

more here

women & cruising facebook page here

Aakron Boats has the widest range of quality inflatable boats and RIB’s in New Zealand, all at the best possible prices. Buy direct and save.

more here

facebook page here

 

No Extreme 40 action

Day 5, Act 5 of the Extreme Sailing Series Cowes on Wednesday, 10 August, was cancelled for first time in the circuit’s history due to challenging sea and wind conditions in the Solent.

Act 5, Cowes Oman Air under storm jib off Egypt Point. Credit Lloyd Images.

‘Extreme’, ‘dangerous’ and ‘on the edge’ – these were the skipper’s descriptions of the conditions that led to cancellation of Day 5 of Act 5 in Cowes. It seems even the Extreme Sailing Series does have its limits in a sport powered by nature.

For the spectators amassed ashore at the Extreme Sailing Series Race Village at Egypt Point it was a delightful afternoon under the summer sun, but on the water the wind was blowing a steady 25-28 knots, combined with a strong tide, and several boats competing in Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week were to be seen in the distance limping back to port with broken masts.

more here

 

News

About the author

The author didnt add any Information to his profile yet
No Responses to “Yachting News 15th August 2011”

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

You need Flash Player 8 or higher to view video content with the ROO Flash Player. Click here to download and install it.