Yachting News 6th May 2010

May 05, 2010 No Comments by

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Greetings yachties,

In this issue:

Team Kiwi Match

AC34 Press Conference

Wild Eyes arrives in Capetown

Laura Dekka

Jessica Watson – Where is she now?

Abby Sunderland

Figaro Transat

Harold Bennett

Spring Regatta at Stenungsbaden Yacht Club

Reid Stowe and Soanya Ahmads – 1000 days at sea

Louis Vuitton Trophy

Ken Ring Predict Weather

Des Top News

Valencia Sailing talks to Adam Minoprio

Plastiki

Hublot PalmaVela 2010

ISAF Making Waves latest issue here

Super Yacht Business News here

Enjoy

Join Team Kiwi Match on Facebook here

Visit there website here

34th America’s Cup – new vision revealed

Rome, May 6th, 2010
The oldest trophy in international sport: re-energised by unprecedented collaboration between the Defender and the Challengers.

-New, fair rules and independent professional management will give an equal opportunity to all teams
- A new class of fast, exciting boats created in conjunction with all teams
- The 159 year old competition made irresistible to commercial partners with regular racing in multiple venues under professional, neutral race management
- Transformed television and online coverage will place race fans right at the heart of the action, wherever they are in the world

This was the message today at the first press conference of the 34th America’s Cup, which saw the trophy brought to the home city of the Challenger of Record, the Club Nautico di Roma.

Speaking in the Sala Exedra in Rome’s Musei Capitolini, surrounded by some of Rome’s most precious treasures, Russell Coutts representing the defending Golden Gate Yacht Club and Vincenzo Onorato on behalf of the Challenger of Record, mapped out the future of the America’s Cup.

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Watch live streaming video from 34thac at livestream.com
Watch live streaming video from 34thac at livestream.com

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Abby has safely arrived in Capetown, South Africa to make repairs to “Wild Eyes” before heading back out to sea to finish her round the world sail. She is the youngest person to ever sail around Cape Horn, and although her non-stop, unassisted attempt is over, she plans on continuing her circumnavigation. Her blog entry and a photo by South African photo-journalist Eben Human is below. Thanks Eben!

Well, I made it into Cape Town today.

Everyone had been a little worried because my ETA happened to be right in the middle of a gale.   I ended up getting ahead of the heavier wind, but was still in about 25 knots gusting up to 30 and getting pretty rough out.  We had been told by some sailors form around here that it can be very hard to get into Cape Town and that 30 knots was the max amount of wind to try and come in with.

The past few days had been slightly unpleasant.  I haven’t slept much in the past few days with all the shipping and not at all last night.  It’s been windy, which is great in the open ocean when you can take it at comfortable angles because you don’t have any nearby land to run into.  Since I was heading into Cape Town I was just trying to get myself there as fast as possible to avoid the gale.

About 5 miles out, soaked, uncomfortable and pretty worried, I still couldn’t see land because of the fog.   All of a sudden the sun came out, the wind died down to a nice 15 knots and I had just changed course to head in towards the breakwater so I had the wind more behind me and was surfing nicely down the swell.  A dolphin came out to play at the bow of Wild Eyes, surfing along with us.  With the sun out land was just about visible and it was really a great end to the past few less than fun days.

Eventually my Dad, Zac, and Scott came out with a bigger boat filled with media.  It was a little intimidating, all the people and cameras, big boats and such.  But I had to laugh at myself a little, I’ve been half way around the world, had spent the previous nights dodging many large (up to 250 meter long) ships, and this little sixty foot power boat with a few media people on board was scaring me!

Getting in was a little trick, because my one working auto pilot display was down below.  Once I entered Table Bay, I started up my engine and dropped my main, then hearing some strange sounds I looked behind my to see black smoke pouring out the exhaust, well, there went my engine.

The guys in Cape Town where a great help.  They tied up beside me and helped me in and that all went well.  So, now we have another job on our list, but its better things break now then later on when I’m back out in the middle of the ocean.

At the dock I hopped off the boat to the waiting media.  They were all really nice people and having talked to people so little in the last few months, I found myself actually enjoying all the questions and people!  I got Wild Eyes settled into her new slip, and then went up to the hotel for a nice warm meal and a shower.  The ground wasn’t exactly stable, it’s very hard to walk in a straight line when the ground is moving… and I felt like I was going to fall of out of a chair when I sat down.

That is all for tonight.  It’s getting late here and I need to get to bed.  We have a lot of work to do tomorrow, and I will make sure to post pictures!!

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Laura Dekker kan vanaf nu zeilen op haar eigen boot. De afgelopen maanden zeilde ze alleen op boten van anderen. Lees meer.

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Day Off, Headwinds and What Next?

Tuesday, May 04, 2010

Yesterday I finally got the day I wanted for a long time. Clear skies, small seas and light winds. What a novelty not to have to hang on for grim life 24/7, well that’s a slight exaggeration, but still it was a real treat.

First off I had the best sleep I’ve had in a long time and was eventually woken up mid morning by a friendly voice over the VHF radio as another customs plane dropped by to say hi. I spent the rest of the day being really lazy with the sailing side of things.

Instead, I caught up on a few jobs in the sunshine, got some washing done and gave myself a pampering with all my Ella Bache goodies. I’m not just saying this because they’re my sponsor. Ella Bache really has some amazing
products. It says a lot that after 6 months of salt and wind, my skin is better than it’s ever been! I highly recommend their sunscreens and after-sun products.

Today the wind was back, but right on Ella’s Pink Lady’s bow so progress wasn’t great. Still, no complaints. Sydney sure looks close from this side of Tasmania which has got me really excited about being so close to finishing.

But it is also a big reminder for me to make the most of my last days out here. I always said that by half way around the world I’d have a pretty good idea of what I want to do next,  but it turns out that I was wrong. Here I am almost the whole way around the world and there’s millions of things I can’t wait to do next!

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Where is Jessica now?

A Post From Home

Abby has had a long day/night and so I offered to type up a blog update for her.

Her approach to Cape Town has been pretty steady over the past few days so much so that we were afraid that she would arrive before her dad and team member Scott Lurie touch down tomorrow at noon South Africa time. Fortunately, she looks to be right on course for a 3:00pm arrival – just before the next cold front really hits hard. She has a backup plan to head into Hout Bay if the conditions are too rough but so far the plan is to head to Table Bay/Cape Town at the V&A Waterfront Marina.

As most of you know, Abby was super concerned about shipping in the area. She is using her Raytheon Radar, her AIS WatchMate ships radar and her Watch Commander to help her stay on top of the situation. No ships within hailing or danger range yet.

Friend and veteran sailor, Erik Bjerring of Wiltel Marine, will be coordinating a boat to bring Zac, Laurence and Scott out to greet Abby and guide her into the marina. Erik has been invaluable in assessing the local weather and routing options, informing the appropriate NSRI officials of her arrival, fielding media requests, arranging berthing and even finding a 5 star restaurant to prepare whatever Abby would like to eat on her arrival. (The only thing she could think of straight away was a cold drink).

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Luncheon with Harold Bennett

Regatta Director and Principal Race Officer
for the 33rd America’s Cup
Squadron Ballroom
Friday 28th May, 12.15pm
After many months of back and forth court action, BMW Oracle Racing, the American challenger, won the 33rd America’s Cup Match back in February in Valencia, sweeping past the Swiss defender, Alinghi, to a 2-0 victory. This was an historic race for the oldest trophy in international sport, featuring two of the most innovative boats on the planet.
But the battle on the water paled in comparison to what reportedly happened just before the start of the final race aboard the Race Committee boat.
Come listen to Harold Bennett, former Assistant General Manager of the Squadron and Regatta Director and Principal Race Officer for the 33rd America’s Cup, in a conversation with Peter Montgomery, top international yachting commentator, in a ‘chat show’ format about what exactly went on.

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800 miles solo on minis 6.50 from the 4th, at 12 am, to the 14th of May 2010.
- A qualifying race for both the 2010 Azores-Les Sables and 2011 The Charente-Maritime/Bahia Transat 6.50.

The Mini Pavois is set to be interesting as the first solo race of the season for the Minis with a leg of 500+ miles.

A week out to the start there are 47 sailors with the list still growing, with some still waiting to register following the Select 6.50. Many newcomers are expected in both classes, the Protos and Series. The Mini Pavois is the first single-handed race for the Minis this year.

650 class mini updates here

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A short wrap up movie from last weekend during the annual Spring Regatta at Stenungsbaden Yacht Club.

Reid Stowe and Soanya Ahmads South Atlantic Adventures July through September 07.

10 Teams, Five Rounds, One Winner as the Louis Vuitton Trophy comes to La Maddalena, Sardinia

The best sailors in the world will be in Italy later this month as Sardinia prepares to host 10 top sailing teams at the Louis Vuitton Trophy La Maddalena from 22nd May through 6th June.

Three Italian entries, including the host Mascalzone Latino Audi Team, Azzurra and Luna Rossa will be battling with teams such as the Defender of the America’s Cup, BMW ORACLE Racing and perennial favourite Emirates Team New Zealand, for supremacy on the sparkling waters of the Mediterranean Sea.

An innovative regatta format has been developed that will allow all teams the greatest opportunity to advance to the next step, while rewarding teams who do well with second chances.

Initially, each team will sail every other team once in a single round robin. The top eight teams will advance to the next stage and the round robin seeding will continue to be used in later stages. Doing well in the round robin will have its rewards.

“Having each of the teams sail each other at least once is very important,” said Peter ‘Luigi’ Reggio, the Principal Race Officer for the regatta. “The teams really want this opportunity.”

In the middle elimination rounds, top-ranked teams are matched against the lower ranked teams – that’s one of the rewards for doing well early – and the winning teams keep advancing, through to a semi final and final.

“If a top seed loses in the middle rounds, they’ll get a second chance to earn a way back in. Conversely, if a lower ranked team gets hot and starts winning, they’ll keep racing. It’s an interesting and fair format.”

The teams will race on four equalised America’s Cup Class boats supplied by the event – ITA 90, ITA 99, USA 87 and USA 98. The boats have now arrived on site and will be prepared for racing.

The logistics team is also now working in La Maddalena as the event organisers begin preparations to host the 10 teams, their friends, families, partners and sponsors, as well as sailing fans from around the world.

La Maddalena is small town (population near 12 000) on an island with the same name that sits just one nautical mile off the Northeast coast of Sardinia and offers up some of the most stunning backdrops for sailing in the Mediterranean.

The race village will be set up about one kilometre to the east of the centre of town, near the southeast corner of the island.

The 10 teams competing in the Louis Vuitton Trophy La Maddalena represent eight countries:

Aleph, FRA, skipper, Bertrand Pacé,
All4One, FRA/GER, skipper, Jochen Schümann,
Artemis, SWE, skipper, Paul Cayard,
Azzurra, ITA, skipper, Francesco Bruni,
BMW ORACLE Racing, USA, skipper, James Spithill,
Emirates Team New Zealand, NZL, skipper, Dean Barker,
Luna Rossa, ITA, skipper, Ed Baird,
Mascalzone Latino Audi Team, ITA, skipper, Gavin Brady,
Synergy, RUS, skipper, Karol Jablonski,
TEAMORIGIN, GBR, skipper, Ben Ainslie,

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Cold nights in the southern hemisphere, chance of frosts. The moon begins to trek north tomorrow. Earthquake potential due to a powerful solar wind. Ireland can expect less than 6 more rain days in May, and fine weather to take hold in the third week of the month.

Valencia Sailing

Adam Minoprio talks to Valencia Sailing about the Volvo Ocean Race

Adam Minoprio, the reigning ISAF World Match Racing Champion and winner of the 2009 World Match Racing Tour, was in Calpe for the Open de España, calling tactics on Michelle Perris’ yacht. Valencia Sailing caught up with Minoprio and talked about Team New Zealand and their Volvo Ocean Race project.

Valencia Sailing: Let’s start with the obvious question. Why do you want to do the Volvo Ocean Race?
Adam Minoprio: Growing up in New Zealand, as a boy I watched the Whitbread coming into Auckland and most of New Zealand’s greatest sailors have gone through the Volvo Ocean Race. It’s also a natural step of progression for me and since the opportunity came along, I certainly jumped into it. I really look forward to it.

Valencia Sailing: It’s certainly a change for you, going from short upwind/downwind legs in small boats to sailing 40,000 miles around the globe.
Adam Minoprio: It’s going to be a huge difference and that’s part of the challenge but at the end of the day it is just boat sailing and I’m sure it’s going to be a lot of fun. I have done a few offshore races, not as many as I probably would like, and I enjoyed all of them.

Valencia Sailing: What’s the longest offshore race you have done?
Adam Minoprio: It’s the Sydney Hobart and we did it in a pretty quick time, two days and two hours on a TP52.

Valencia Sailing: What will the biggest challenge as far as you are concerned?
Adam Minoprio: I think the whole thing is going to be a challenge. Every aspect of the project will be a challenge on itself although I can’t single out any in particular. Nevertheless, it’s challenge I look forward to taking on. I will be one of the drivers and trimmers of the boat and the basic principles of what a boat go fast or slow are the same. I have helmed Maximus when she was on the water and it’s not that different. The main difference I see from the smaller boats is that on big boats things happen slower.

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