Yachting News Fathers Day 2009

Sep 06, 2009 1 Comment by

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Greetings yachties

Perini Navi Cup

L’Hydroptere

18ft skiffs

Jessica Watson

Melges 32

Istanbul Europa Race

Jorge Flethes

Alinghi D35

Enjoy

more later :-)

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Perini Navi Cup
Porto Cervo, Sardinia, ITA
September 3 – 5, 2009

MALTESE FALCON PREVAILS IN PERINI NAVI CUP

September 5, 2009

Saturday dawned with the strong breeze of the previous day blowing across the Costa Smeralda unabated. Upwards of 35 knots were recorded off Porto Cervo, causing the YCCS race committee to announce a postponement for the start of today’s racing in the Perini Navi Cup. But after one hour, it was clear from the conditions and the forecast that the winds would not diminish soon enough to get racing in.

At a brief skippers’ meeting, the YCCS Principal Race Officer, Peter Craig and the race organizers consulted with the yacht owners and made the decision to cancel racing for the day. The scores for Race 1 sailed yesterday stand as the series result with 1) Maltese Falcon, 2) Felicita’ West, and 3) Antara.

The well-known yacht designer Ron Holland – whose firm is celebrating their 35th year — has been working with Perini Navi for over ten years. At this year’s Perini Navi Cup, several of his designs were in Porto Cervo to compete, including Salute, Riela, Felicita’ West, Ohana, and Parsifal III.

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Alt_Hydroptère - _Gilles Martin-Raget

l’Hydroptère, the French foiling trimaran became the fastest yacht on the planet yesterday, setting a new record for the 500 metre mark of 51.36 knots, thus beating the previous record set by kitesurfer Alex Caizergues who held the previous record of 50.57kts set in Namibia last year.

Alain Thébault and his crew also set new records for the 1000 metres lifting this mark from 43.09kts to 48.72 kts.

The records were established at Hyères (and are subject to the ratification of the WSSRC). A westerly wind of 28 kts was blowing for the records.

During the run Alain Thébault and his crew hit 55,5 kts (103 km/h) and a set a mean velocity of 51.36 kts.

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Hamlin’s team unflippable in big wind finale

photos by Sergei Zavarin

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In some sailboat racing circles it’s traditional to dunk the winners, but at the eighth annual 18′ Skiff International Regatta hosted by the St. Francis Yacht Club the winners were the only ones who didn’t get dunked.

Howie Hamlin, 56, of Long Beach, Calif. and his crew of Paul Allen, 34, and Matt Noble, 23, won it the hard way Friday by coming from behind in the 10th and last race to finish one point ahead of Australia’s John (Woody) Winning. But mostly they did it by keeping their Harken-sponsored skiff right-side-up as everyone—everyone—else around them was doing tumbling acts in the toughest conditions of the five-day event.

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When it’s blowing a solid 20 to 25 knots with gusts to 28, as it was Friday, sailing an 18 is a high-wire act in a hurricane, and capsizing is part of the game. But Hamlin’s team remained the only one of 13 that never flipped, certainly a factor in achieving his fifth win in this regatta.

Hamlin came into the day with a one-point lead, but Winning had two advantages: an edge in the tiebreaker by having won more races, plus a one-point edge on the second discard that would take effect after the ninth race.

So Hamlin almost needed to win both races because Winning likely wouldn’t be far behind in either. Hamlin’s was the first boat on the course, checking currents as well as wind directions, and he led by 30 seconds at the first mark near the Golden Gate Bridge, with Winning third.

For awhile Hamlin appeared to be running away, but Winning was flying away from everyone else into second place, and as the fleet approached the leeward mark Hamlin’s lead vanished.

“They got a puff behind us and sagged down underneath us,” Hamlin said. “There was really nothing we could do.”

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Jessica’s blessing

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Ready To Go: 16-year-old Jessica Watson is almost ready to set sail on her epic solo voyage. Photo: John McCutcheon/184784

Jess Watson’s much anticipated around-the-world solo sailing voyage is edging closer.

The 16-year-old Buderim girl is set to embark on the expected eight-month trip within a day or two.

If Jess is successful in her attempt she will be the youngest person to complete a solo non-stop circumnavigation of the globe.

And she has more than her family and friends praying for her success and safe return.

On Thursday, Stella Maris Father Geoff Baron blessed the boat and the young sailor’s adventurous spirit.

The blessing, which was attended by family, was a gift organised by Jess’ New Zealand grandmother Billie.

Jess’ mother, Julie, said the trip was brought closer, thanks to Ella Bache signing on as the major sponsor.

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2009 Melges 32 North American Championship Kicks Off This Weekend At Sausalito Yacht Club

September 5-7 ©2008 JOY | International

Sausalito, Calif. (September 4) – High-powered, performance sportboat racing for seven high-quality Melges 32 teams begins this weekend at the very first North American Championship, hosted by theSausalito Yacht Club on September 5-7.

Entries include various local favorites such as North American Fleet President Stephen Pugh on USA-158 Taboo with Seadon Wijsen on tactics, John Kilroy on USA-13131 Samba Pa Ti will employ the tactical expertise of Morgan Reeser, and seated at the right and left hand of Philippe Kahn on USA-166 Pegasus 32 is tactician Mark ‘Crusty’ Christensen.

Also competing from the San Francisco area is Don Jesberg on USA-162 Viva. He will be sailing with the one and only, entirely bow-to-stern Corinthian crew – Zarko Draganic will call tactics, long-time crew mate Andrew Holdsworth, Thomas Iseler, Eric Baumhoff, Stephen Marsh, Jeff Wayne and Kristen Loewenthal.

Traveling from Seattle, Wash. is Derek Campbell on USA-138 Banshee and serving as tactician is Karl Funk. Campbell has competed in the fleet many times over with his first appearance being at the 2008 U.S. National Championship held in Newport, R.I. His first time out in this quite competitive fleet, Derek did well finishing 5th overall. He competed this past January in Key West and further proved that he is a force to be reckoned by landing another top five finish. Long overdue for a big win, Campbell is expected to excel this weekend on his home coast.

The International Melges 32 Class Association (IM32CA) would like to welcome fleet new comers Burt Benrud and Andy Lovell on USA-136 Rougarou. Based out of New Orleans, La., the Rougarouteam includes Andy’s brother, Olympic medallist Johnny Lovell and 2009 Gold Cup winning tactician Scott Nixon.

Last, but most certainly not least is reigning Melges 32 East Coast Champion Jim Swartz from Edgartown, Mass. on USA-007 Q. Swartz will be without his regular tactician Gavin Brady this weekend, instead he will rely on the extraordinary talents of Kimo Worthington. Definitely a team to watch, Swartz’s Melges 32 may very well be the team to beat.

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Foncia et Groupe Bel complètent le podium à Nice

Avec l’arrivée de Foncia et Groupe Bel à Nice, le podium de la première étape de l’Istanbul Europa Race affiche complet. Pointés respectivement 1 heures 05 minutes 39 secondes et 2 heures 05 minutes 04 secondes après les premiers, les équipages de Michel Desjoyeaux et Kito de Pavant, viennent une fois encore démontrer l’extrême homogénéité du niveau des forces en présence. Ce trio de tête met à l’honneur les trois leaders successifs qui se sont disputés les honneurs entre Istanbul et la Baie des Anges. Après sept jours de course, il aura donc fallu attendre la dernière ligne droite pour voir la victoire de 1876, coiffant sur le fil le vainqueur du Vendée Globe resté piégé dans une bulle sans vent. Avec cette troisième place à Nice, Kito de Pavant garde le sourire qui le caractérise même s’il admet que la réussite lui aura un peu manqué. Il y aura de la revanche dans l’air dès mardi pour la deuxième étape vers Barcelone.

Foncia prend la deuxième place à NiceJacques Vapillon ®

Michel Desjoyeaux – Foncia « J’aime bien le fair play de Guillermo Altadill qui dit avoir gagné avec la chance… J’ai le sourire en dépit de la deuxième place parce que cette régate nous a donné beaucoup de plaisir. Jusqu’au bout sur cette Mer Méditerranée, ç’a été le grand bazar à tel point que je me suis demandé si on avait quitté Istanbul. La situation a toujours été incertaine mais en franchissant le Cap Corse avec 17 milles d’avance sur 1876 et Groupe Bel avec 100 milles à faire, je pensais que c’était tenable. Nous sommes restés concentrés, nous n’avons pas cessé de manoeuvrer jusqu’au bout mais Guillermo dans le final a fait une super navigation. De cette semaine je retiens que Foncia est un bateau très performant en équipage. Nous avons bien travaillé tout en prenant le temps de manger, dormir et rigoler. Je me dis que cette course en Méditerranée avec quinze bateaux la prochaine fois, ce sera génial. »

Kito de Pavant – Groupe Bel

« Je suis un peu frustré parce que le bateau est vraiment bon mais dans la dernière journée je n’ai pas été à la hauteur. Nous avons eu un petit problème technique avec un solent déchiré et que j’ai hésité à envoyer quand j’étais à côté de 1876 auprès du Cap Corse. A ce moment, mes routages m’ont fait partir à l’est et Guillermo Altadill a pris l’ouest. J’aurais mieux fait de le suivre. Cette semaine de course a quand même été très intéressante avec beaucoup de coups à tenter et la nécessité d’une analyse permanente. Nous avons beaucoup tenté mais nous avons manqué de réussite et finalement nous avons beaucoup subi. Nous étions rythmé tous les jours par l’arrivée des classements en hésitant parfois à ouvrir les fichiers. En revanche nous n’avons pas été influencés par la stratégie de nos rivaux parce qu’en Méditerranée, la météo peut changer à deux milles près. Il reste deux étapes, la deuxième en Méditerranée jusqu’à Barcelone, la dernière vers Brest avec le passage de Gibraltar qui sera déterminant. Groupe Bel est troisième mais je n’ai pas à rougir de finir derrière Guillermo Altadill et Michel Desjoyeaux. »

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GP42: checked to the milimetre

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Jorge Flethes (ESP) seems to move fluidly among teams and on every boat in the GP42 fleet. But who is he? He wears sailing kit, but does not seem to be with any one team, nor does he seem to be with the Audi MedCup organisation or the media. Yet he has full access to all secured areas of the venues, and is out on the water each day with his own RIB and a radio, boarding the winning boat after each race even before their own support boat can come alongside.

It turns out that just like the race managers, Jury members, and Audi MedCup organisers, Jorge Flethes too is an important and key element to the close racing in the GP42 Series: he is the Class Measurer, the policeman who ensures that all boats and teams conform to the rules.

In a game where races are won and lost on a scale of metres and seconds, each team looks for every possible advantage to give them an edge. And in highly technical and high-performance boats like the GP42’s and TP52’s, this means measurements have to be scrutinised to within millimeters, weights within grams, and other interpretations made to comply with the so-called “box rules” where tolerances are allowed within a small range to encourage evolution of design and innovation.

So just as the Jury on the water watches to ensure right-of-way rules are being honored, so Jorge watches to see that these measurement rules are also being honored, and each boat’s dimensions are summarised on an official certificate of measurement that Jorge must ratify.

We had a chance to chat with Jorge about his role and what is entailed with the measurement of a GP42.

Audi MedCup: Where and how does the process begin?
Jorge Flethes: “ It all begins at the boat-builder, where a new boat’s hull is measured for length and beam as soon as the deck is put on. I also then check that it has the required internal structure and other features required by the rules.

Next will be the keel and the bulb. I measure the bulb dimensions, the keel fin at its top and bottom, and make sure there are no materials used outside the rules. Then I weigh both when they’re assembled, though we’re considering changing this next year to weigh them separately (so there’s no pressure to minimise the fin weight to put more into the bulb). Right now the maximum weight for both is 2300 kg.”

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Challenge Julius Baer – D35

Two firsts for Alinghi at the D35 GP Cup La Reserve

Trimmer Nils Frei gives today’s ‘Quote from the race boat’

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(Photo credit: Chris Schmid)

On day one of the GP Cup La Reserve – the penultimate D35 regatta of the season long Julius Baer Challenge on Lake Geneva – the Alinghi D35 SUI1 took two bullets. Alinghi.com talks to Swiss trimmer, Nils Frei, about the day’s racing:

How did the day go for Alinghi?
Nils Frei, trimmer: It was a good day for us, we managed to get in four races and two wins. The conditions were light, but fair; around 8-10knots. Overall we are happy with the results even though we made a couple of mistakes during the day. We could have done much better and hopefully we will tomorrow.

How do you manage the transition from the giant Alinghi 5 to the much smaller D35?
NF: Well it’s a really big change in terms of the loads and the scale of things, but having said that, when we sail Alinghi 5 we are lucky enough to be able to apply our knowledge from the small boats certainly in terms of the onboard communications and manoeuvres. It’s always good fun and good practice to get back to the small boats as we learn things on the D35 that we can take back to Alinghi 5.

What does this type of small boat racing bring to the overall Alinghi programme for the 33rdAC?
NF: On the small boats, the small things make a big difference, for example the way we twist the sails or anticipate manoeuvres. You can learn all these things much more easily on small boats and then take the knowledge back to big boats.

A look forward to tomorrow, the final day of the GP Cup La Reserve?
NF: Well we are leading today after the first four races and the forecast is looking promising for tomorrow: a 10-12 Northeasterly “bise”. We hope to be able to get in another four races and then we can discard the worst race of the weekend.

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Fullers Stink #2

6th September
2009
written by Cynic

So while Mr Hudson is blaming the stench that permeated the Superflyte on a broken fan can he please explain why it is necessary to pump out the sewerage tanks on the Quickcat as the passengers depart the 7:20. If anyone has Doug Hudson’s mobile number we would like it so we can text hum every time we have to pass through that vomit inducing stench.
Tags: Fullers, Protest, Quickcat, Waiheke, Waiheke Island

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One Response to “Yachting News Fathers Day 2009”

  1. Steve Noel Sr. says:

    Steve Noel Sr….

    Your topic Flats Fishing | Key West Flats Fishing was interesting when I found it on Saturday searching for skiff boats as I also have articles and information posted on this subject. Thank You… Best Regards Steve Noel Sr….

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