Foilers Part 1

Aug 25, 2008 14 Comments by

 

Greetings yachties,

The following is a brief look at the work gone into Foilers and the quest for speed. The latest news is at the end of the thread.

Enjoy

R Class lifts off October 2008

Warning: There are alot of links in this post, I suggest you open a second tab so you don’t get lost, Logan.

From here

On the 3rd of December 1869, a French inventor by the name of Emmanuel Denis Farcot registered a patent. His vision was to create an effect for high-speed boats that would raise the hull on a parallel, in order to reduce the drag.

The idea of the hydrofoil was born at this time, Emmanuel Denis Farcot having opted for the installation of numerous small foils along the hull so as to lift it up and reduce the drag.

more here

The Wright Brothers, precursors of American aviation, invented the first aeroplane. In 1907, they succeeded in lifting off the ground a catamaran equipped with booster planes.

Other attempts would follow.
Italians, English and Americans would all embark on this flying sailboat race.

 

Enrico Forlanini, was an Italian engineer whose interests included airships, aircraft and helicopters. His hydrofoil developments started in 1898 with a series of model tests from which he arrived at several simple mathematical relationships. These allowed him to proceed with the design and construction of a full scale craft.

Gaetano Arturo CROCCO was an Italian engineer born in Naples on Oct. 26, 1877. Since 1900, when, after the University and the Army Artillery Academy, he became Lieutenant of the Italian Army Engineers, he started experiments and studies in many different fields. He can be considered as a pioneer of the aviation and the father of aerodynamics’ studies in Italy. For teaching aerodynamics, with the support of Vito VOLTERRA, he founded in 1908 the Italian Central Aeronautical Institute, and later on, in 1912, he realized the first italian experimental wind tunnel, followed soon by a second one, and finally by a third, specially used for high wind speed (up to 200 km/h) till WWII.

more here

In 1919, the HD4 prototype established a speed record of 70.86 miles/hour (114.04 km/h), which it held for over ten years.

HD-4 of Graham Bell in 1919

For more than forty years, the system particularly attracted designers of motorised ships, who, one after another, would take on calm-water speed records.

BARON HANNS von SCHERTEL

In 1927 while a student at the Technical University in Berlin-Charlottenburg, he began experimental work with the objective of finding a hydrofoil solution to the seakeeping problems of the flying boat. During the next eight years, the Baron built and tested seven experimental boats. He evaluated a number of foil configurations including both surface piercing and submerged foil concepts. By 1935 he had a working submerged foil test craft but was disappointed with his mechanical depth control device. Recognizing that the development of a satisfactory working depth sensor would require more time, he turned his efforts to the surface piercing system.

more here

Professor Oscar Tietjens, another hydrofoil pioneer, patented a surface-piercing hoop foil system that was first tested on a small speed boat at Philadelphia in 1932 (the 500 lb. craft reached a speed of about 25 mph with only a 5 hp outboard motor). Tietjens later returned to Germany, where he continued his development work in parallel with Baron von Schertel. The VS-7 hydrofoil, a 17-ton craft with a hoop foil system, was built in Schleswig, Germany at the Vertens Yacht Yard. The VS-7 was built to the same displacement and had the same power as von Schertel’s VS-6. Although the VS-7 attained a speeds up to 55 knots compared to the 47 knots of the VS-6, the stability and maneuverability of Tietjen’s hydrofoil was much poorer than that of the VS-6, and had difficulty with takeoff.

In 1951, another American by the name of Wright achieved a real feat: he assembled two canoe-hulls equipped with booster planes, added a sail and set forth for a “flight” over the sea that would last for “quite a long minute”.

more here

At the same time as Mr. Wright, another American, J.G. Baker, designed the Monitor for the U.S. Navy from 1950 to 1956, which achieved, according to documented information, the speed of 38 knots, an incredible speed for the time.

Several years later, a Flying Dutchman was equipped with hydrofoils without modifying the structure. Her top speed was thus increased by five knots.

Then, simultaneously, the Navy and the Maritime Transport developed a hydrofoil technique that had the advantage of increased stability and greater speed.

brasdor1

brasdors4

The ship had a full load weight of 200 tons, a length of 151 ft, a hull beam of 21.5 ft, and a foil span of 66 ft. Crew size – 29. She was designed by DeHavilland, completed in 1967, and arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia on 1 July 1968 to begin a long series of trials. From September of 1968 until July 1971, when the trials terminated, the ship logged 648 hours, 552 hullborne, and 96 hours foilborne. The most operationally representative trial was a 2,500 mile voyage to Hamilton, Bermuda, and Norfolk, Virginia, in June 1971. Foilborne, BRAS D’OR exceeded her calm-water design speed, achieving 63 knots at full load in 3 to 4 foot waves.

more here


In the 1960’s, HMCS Golden Arm 400, an experimental hydroptère, was designed by the Canadian Royal Navy for the detection of soviet submarines.

46.5 meters long, 6.55 meters wide, 19.8 meters wing span with her supporting wings and 200 tonnes are the technical characteristics of the motorised hydroptère which could attain speeds of 12 knots on the hull and 50 to 60 knots on the wings.

This Golden Arm was by far the most advanced of her era, but the project was abandoned, operating costs were too high and the necessary adjustments were too many.

Subsequently, research would result in the production of smaller crafts.

A French pioneer of hydrofoil sailing boats, Claude Tisserand, began studying this subject in 1964. In May 1966, trials were begun on the Veliplane I, a trimaran 4.50 meters long that attained 15 knots and demonstrated the possibilities of the concept.

from wikipieda

Claude Weaver is a pioneer french sailboats to hydrofoils.

Il commence ses études sur ce sujet marin en 1964. He began his studies on the subject marine in 1964. En mai 1966 débutent les essais du Veliplane I , trimaran de 4,50 m de long qui atteint 15 nœuds et démontre les possibilités de la formule. In May 1966 start trials Veliplane I trimaran 4.50 m long, which reached 15 knots and demonstrates the potential of the formula. Malgré un bel article dans la revue « Nautisme » en novembre 1966, personne ne s’intéresse à la formule en France jusqu’à ce qu’ Eric Tabarly présente en août 1976 une maquette du Pen Duick VII , pratiquement identique au Veliplane IV , qui atteint 20 nœuds au cours de l’été 1976. Despite a fine article in the magazine “Sailing” in November 1966, nobody is interested in the formula in France until that Eric Tabarly in August 1976 presents a model of the Pen Duick VII, virtually identical to Veliplane IV, which reached 20 knots during the summer of 1976. Il travaille également sur les voiles rigides. He also worked on the sails rigid.

A partir de 1980, faute d’intérêt public, il commence à s’intéresser à une nouvelle catégorie d’aéronefs, l’ULM. Starting from 1980, lack of public interest, he became interested in a new category of aircraft, ultralights. Outre les ULM pendulaires Puce du Ciel , il réalisera l’hydravion ULM Hydroplum I , puis l’ Hydroplum II qui connaitra des développements industriels, et des appareils moins classiques, l’ Amphiplane et l’ Electroplane . In addition to the ULM tilting Puce of Heaven, it will carry out the microlight aircraft Hydroplum I, then the Hydroplum II, who know of industrial development, and less conventional devices, the Amphiplane and the Electroplane.

Claude Weaver is a pioneer french sailboats to hydrofoils.

Il commence ses études sur ce sujet marin en 1964. He began his studies on the subject marine in 1964. En mai 1966 débutent les essais du Veliplane I , trimaran de 4,50 m de long qui atteint 15 nœuds et démontre les possibilités de la formule. In May 1966 start trials Veliplane I trimaran 4.50 m long, which reached 15 knots and demonstrates the potential of the formula. Malgré un bel article dans la revue « Nautisme » en novembre 1966, personne ne s’intéresse à la formule en France jusqu’à ce qu’ Eric Tabarly présente en août 1976 une maquette du Pen Duick VII , pratiquement identique au Veliplane IV , qui atteint 20 nœuds au cours de l’été 1976. Despite a fine article in the magazine “Sailing” in November 1966, nobody is interested in the formula in France until that Eric Tabarly in August 1976 presents a model of the Pen Duick VII, virtually identical to Veliplane IV, which reached 20 knots during the summer of 1976. Il travaille également sur les voiles rigides. He also worked on the sails rigid.

A partir de 1980, faute d’intérêt public, il commence à s’intéresser à une nouvelle catégorie d’aéronefs, l’ULM. Starting from 1980, lack of public interest, he became interested in a new category of aircraft, ultralights. Outre les ULM pendulaires Puce du Ciel , il réalisera l’hydravion ULM Hydroplum I , puis l’ Hydroplum II qui connaitra des développements industriels, et des appareils moins classiques, l’ Amphiplane et l’ Electroplane . In addition to the ULM tilting Puce of Heaven, it will carry out the microlight aircraft Hydroplum I, then the Hydroplum II, who know of industrial development, and less conventional devices, the Amphiplane and the Electroplane.

At the beginning of the seventies, James Grogono experimented with a Tornado on hydrofoils, the Icarus, that participated several times in the Brest speed week and established in 1970 a record of an average of 22.20 knots over 500 meters.

In the mid-1970’s, Eric Tabarly had already imagined and designed a trimaran on hydrofoils, but it was impossible to make her with the materials of the time. She would have to wait for the arrival of composite materials.

Eric Tabarly

Eric Tabarly became a legend in French sailing from the moment he beat the British to win the second edition of the single-handed transatlantic Race. Taking on the British nation and winning for France had a particularly pleasing resonance; and it echoed a usually friendly seafaring rivalry that has exists between the two nations to this day.

In 1979, he built the trimaran Paul Richard, equipped with a hydrofoil, on which he would, in spite of the weight of the aluminium, beat the mythical record for crossing the Atlantic, held at that time by Charlie Barr.

more here

Charles Heidseick VIII
This catamaran was a contemporary of Manureva, Elf Aquitaine etc. Revolutionary for its epoch, it provided the groundwork for progress in the difficult, exciting world of foiler design. Unable to benefit from construction techniques in carbon composites, its weight, considered excessive, prevented it from performing as hoped. However, its behaviour fully validated the concept, upon which its successor would make clear improvements. Its development was unfortunately ended suddenly by new rules limiting the dimensions of racing multihulls.

more here

Hydrofolie, designed by Xavier Joubert, was launched in 1979 for Alain Labbé and Loïc Caradec.

more here

At the end of the 1970’s, Roland Tiercelin launched Trimama, an aluminium foiler with three masts, one on each hull.

In July 1992, the American trifoiler, the Long Shot, smashed the world record for speed for 500 meters, Category A, with an average of 43.55 knots.

In 1997, the French catamaran, Techniques Avancées, established a Class D record over 500 meters with an average of 42.12 knots, which she would hold until April 2007, the date of  l’Hydroptère’s two world records.

1984

1990

The milestones
1975: A team of aeronautical engineers, aircraft part manufacturers and sailors manage to convince Eric Tabarly about the project’s viability;
1987-1992: Alain Thébault builds and adjusts a model on a one-third scale and improves it any time he makes it sail
1st October 1994: l’Hydroptère’s first flight;
1998: Aerospatiale manufactures two new cross beams;
2000: Development of a 3D flight simulator by Philippe Perrier, Technical Manager for Program Rafale, Dassault Aviation;
2004: Installation of the strain absorbers by André Sournat. They now ensure the structure’s strength;
9th February 2005: Blériot’s symbolic record smashed by l’Hydroptère with an average speed of 33 knots in 34 minutes and 24 seconds;
9th August 2005: Thierry and Adrien Lombard join Alain Thébault in l’Hydroptère group
2006: the project took on a new dimension thanks to Thierry and Adrien Lombard . Two new boats, l’Hydroptère.ch and l’Hydroptère maxi, are being studied.
4th April 2007: l’Hydroptère wins two world speed records, officially ratified by the World Sailing Speed Record Council:
500 meter speed record in Category D at an average of 44.81 knots
1 nautical mile speed record, all categories, at an average of 41.69 knots

2007

Alain Thébault
Skipper, pilot and associate of l’Hydroptère

“I thought only of being the strongest, the fastest, the best. I was in permanent competition, almost compulsive, whether running a foot race, doing a math exercise, drawing a geometric figure, applying rules of grammar or mastering spelling,”

Pilote d’un rêve, Alain Thébault, Flammarion.

Born in 1962, under the sign of Virgo, half-mad or half-wise depending on the tides, Alain Thébault once had a dream: to create a flying boat. With the help of Tabarly, the dream became a reality; l’Hydroptère attained 35 knots in 1995, 40 knots in 2004 and 47 knots in 2007. He beats two world speed records on 4th April 2007.

On land: project founder and managing director of the l’Hydroptère Company
At sea: skipper

Sunday 10th August, 2008

After 8 months in the shipyard and 4 months of sailing sessions in Marseille, l’Hydroptère team is taking advantage of the poor weather conditions to take a break.

This is the moment for the team members to recharge their batteries before returning more motivated than ever. The 50-knot record campaign has only just begun, and we’ll be back in September to pursue the adventure.

more here

http://www.speedsailing.com/Background_records.htm

Tri-foiler 100 project
A project more than ever in the news with the barriers of 50 knots and 100 km/h still tempting the recordbeaters.
A cruciform structure with three miniscule contact points and a wetted surface quasi-zero when at full speed.
An extremely precise study of the all-carbon structure is currently in hand at  Rivoyre Ingenierie.

more here

more here

SR-71 Monofoil
Designers Name:
Samuel Schneider, Boulder CO USA
LOA: 4m + 55cm gantry
Beam At Chines: 38cm
Beam At Gunnels: 80cm
Beam of Racks: 180cm, adjustable out to 250cm
Rocker: 3cm bow and stern
Mast Length: 6.5m + 50cm kingpin (7m overall)
Boom Length: 240cm
Sail Area: 11sm (full batten pocket luff)
Target Weight: 38-40kg all up
Proposed Setup: Trapeze equipped, end boom sheeting, dual tillers, standard vang, downhaul and outhaul.
Rudder Foil: NACA 66014 vertical, H105 lifting section
Main Foil: NACA 66014 vertical, H105 lifting section 7deg vertiacl AOA
Construction: Carbon/Kevlar/Epoxy with Foam core

more here

David Allen Keiper, 67, died of heart failure June 27, 1998 at a Cape Girardeau MO hospital. His brother Frank Keiper is executor of the estate.

Dave Keiper is best known and honored for having pioneered and developed the world’s first hydrofoil sailing yacht, a 32-footer named WILLIWAW in which he cruised around the Pacific in the late1960s, early 1970s, sailing as far south as New Zealand. He loved the sea and designing smoother, faster sailing vessels. Dave’s book Hydrofoil Voyager tells WILLIWAW‘s story; the book is part adventure, part how-to manual… exciting to read and full of hard earned technical advice. Both the book and the acompanying videotape are now out of print; Frank Keiper has sold out all remaining copies.

Shortly before his death Dave had started a new business, DAK Hydrofoils to provide add-on hydrofoil kits for sailing catamarans. At the time of his death he had delivered only his first two kits (it is suggested to visit Dave Carlson’s website; he assisted Dave Keiper in sea trials and refinement of the kit design). Note: an unorganized set of Dave Keiper’s files on his designs for add-on hydrofoil kits is available from IHS. For details, Click Here.

Dave Keiper often said, “Happy Sailing to all of you.” His ashes were sprinkled on the Pacific Ocean where he sailed for many miles. IHS and the sailing world have lost a good friend, a true hydrofoil pioneer.

more here

more here

International Hydrofoil Society

PO BOX 51 – CABIN JOHN MD 20818 – USA

Bienvenue sur le site de PK
Hydroptère de loisirs



part 2 here

Designer, Foilers, Local yachting, Multihull, new stuff, News, Profile, Video

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14 Responses to “Foilers Part 1”

  1. Steve says:

    send in all your foiler stories and I’ll post them here :)

  2. sean says:

    Hi, we are currently building foils to put on our R class skiff. I will send pics and info once we have done this as at this stage we are finishing the molds off and hope to start the build in the coming weeks. The R class rules allow for this development and all the guys are keen on it. Sean Milner

  3. Buster says:

    Following up on your SYZ & CO hydrofoil catamaran story, you might be interested to know that, after a few teething problems, the boat has taken off this week for the first time. Smashing photos and a brand new website on http://www.syzfoiler.com/?lang=en

  4. Yachting News April says:

    [...] more foilers here [...]

  5. Sailing & Yachting says:

    Sailing & Yachting…

    [...] 4th April 2007: l’Hydroptère wins two world speed records, officially ratified by the World Sailing Speed Record Council: 500 meter speed record in Category D at an average of 44.81 knots 1 nautical mile speed record, all categories, … [...]…

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  8. Foiler Part 2 says:

    [...] Part 1 here [...]

  9. Mulligan2 says:

    yy something on the second page of of this article just eats up CPU…

  10. Yachtyakka Index says:

    [...] Foiling Yachts – P1 [...]

  11. torrmundi says:

    Steve-
    That’s a nice compilation, thanks. It might benefit from the inclusion of some history behind the iron curtain before fall of the USSR regarding multihull foiling yachts.
    -John

    The history of multihulls in Latvia is located here: http://www.ldja.lv/en/history.html, and the debut in 1982 of speed-record breaking (27.0 knots, Category A) foiler Centaurus I is here: http://www.ldja.lv/en/history_1982.html.

    Centaurus II reached 30 knots in 1983. In 1985, they created a foiling trimaran and several experimental proa-style variants.

    In 1996, Aldis Elgajs invented the Catri concept of hydrofoil-based stabilization as implemented in Garupe. See http://www.ldja.lv/en/history_1996.html. A variety of Catri models are available today. You can see the Catri concept here: http://www.catrigroup.com/?lang=en&about=2&id=3 and here: http://www.catri.se

  12. Jim Young Project says:

    Gary Baigent may be a person to contact regarding foiling multi’s. Groucho Marx and Fallen Angel are very impressive examples of local foiler design.

    Jim Young is also currently prototyping a mono-foiling jet powered deep vee powerboat. The design is different in many respects to the examples shown on the site.

    More information will be provided once testing has been completed over the next few months.

    Please feel free to contact us on this topic.

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